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Tomorrow Today 29.04.13 | 00:30 - 01:00 UTC

Studio Guest: Prof. Dr. Christoph Neinhuis from the Dresden University of Technology

Topic 26.04.2013 DW-TV Magazine Projekt Zukunft Talk Neinhuis 01

Studio Guest: Prof. Dr. Christoph Neinhuis from the Dresden University of Technology

Topic 50K Carbonfasern eignen sich zur Herstellung von Prepregs, d.h. zur Kombination mit Epoxidharzen, um flache unidirektionale Gelege herzustellen. Aus diesen Gelegen können durch Formen und Härten beispielsweise Sparren für die Rotorblätter von Windkraftanlagen oder Golfschläger hergestellt werden.

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Topic Übergewicht © PeJo #33800700

Obesity - why fat cells may cause cancer

What technology can learn from animals | how robots learn to move like human beings | why being overweight is a cancer risk

Topics

Bionics - How nature inspires robot design

Cockroaches are masters of movement with incredible abilities. They are extremely quick, have a lot of endurance and are very agile. At the University of California at Berkeley a team of biologists, mathematicians and engineers have been studying how insects and other creatures move, jump, fly and crawl.

Roaches’ ability to defy gravity and leaping lizards that always land perfectly are just a few of the inspirations that have led to some creative designs in the robotics lab.

Studio Guest: Prof. Dr. Christoph Neinhuis from the Dresden University of Technology

Prof. Dr. Christoph Neinhuis talkes about how engineers study nature, where bionic research is heading for, and how long it takes to get results.

Robots - as agile as humans

A team of Swiss researchers have put together a robot with distinct human characteristics - RO-boy. His ability to move is based on a mechanical system of artificial muscles and tendons. The unique system’s struts and strings, electric motors and sensors also allow him to ‘learn’ new movements.

Viewer's question

What are carbon fibres?

Obesity - why fat cells may cause cancer

Fat cells from specific kinds of fat in the body release cancer-enhancing messenger chemicals. The more ‘visceral fat’ you have, the greater the risk you’ll develop carcinoma. New studies have show that obese people are around twice as likely to develop intestinal or breast cancer as people who have normal weight.