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Full episode 07.01.13 | 07:30 - 08:00 UTC

Tomorrow Today - The Science Magazine

Full episode

Tomorrow Today - The Science Magazine

Topic

Space Research - Hotline to the Moon

Topic

What makes the moon so fascinating?

Topic

Viewer's question

Topic

Virtual Reality - Training with simulators

Topic

Sound Sleep - why television keeps you awake

On this edition: Space Research - Hotline to the Moon | Virtual Reality - Training with simulators | On the Defensive - Reaction skills put to the test | Sound Sleep - Television keeps you awake

Topics

Space Research - Hotline to the Moon

Despite funding being scarce, Europe still has grand plans to make it to the Moon Mars. The first goal is to build an outpost on the Moon to facilitate further trips into space. But such a station would have to be contactable at all times.

Space researchers in Stuttgart are working out how to set up a sustained radio connection. They hope to position communication satellites at a spot between the Moon and the Earth where the gravitational forces of the two celestial bodies balance out.

What makes the moon so fascinating?

Interview with planetary geologist Harald Hiesinger

Viewer's question

Oscar Kalleson from Accra (Ghana) asks: Is it possible to mine the moon?

Virtual Reality - Training with simulators

Whether for captains, pilots or doctors – computer simulations are a growing aspect of job training. Their advantage lies in the ability to test out realistic but perfectly safe scenarios, so that candidates can prepare themselves for the real thing in a risk free environment. Tomorrow Today presents some examples.

On the Defensive - reaction skills put to the test

Sometimes even talent and hard training can’t win the match. Sports scientists from the University of Bern wanted to find out which factors are important when playing defense in a beach volleyball match.

In a sensorimotor laboratory, they used a video projection with sensors and special glasses to see how and when the players moved, where they looked and whether their decisions were correct. Among other results, the researchers found a way to more effectively focus the players’ attention on decision-making in the game.

WWW links

Sound Sleep - why television keeps you awake

Blue light can stop you from sleeping, and a Swiss team of researchers have now confirmed that this includes television screens. Large amounts of blue light are emitted from blue backlit screens, strongly influencing the circadian rhythm when it is processed by special light receptors in the eye.

The researchers measured brain waves and the levels of the sleep hormone melatonin and discovered that light from the screens delays the build-up of melatonin by an hour. So staring at an iPad before bed turns out not to be a good idea.