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Full episode 26.11.12 | 00:30 - 01:00 UTC

Tomorrow Today - The Science Magazine

Full episode

Tomorrow Today - The Science Magazine

Topic Gespenstlaufkäfer, aufgespießt in der Käfersammlung des Museum König in Bonn, Rechte: Marlis Schaum

Library of Life - DNA barcodes for the earth's species

Topic Das European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT): Das zukünftige „weltgrößte Auge auf den Himmel“. Europäische Südsternwarte ESO (European Southern Observatory).
Juni, 2012.
Copyright, Credit: : ESO/L. Calçada
E-ELT, Teleskop, European Extremely Large Telescope, Europäische Südsternwarte, ESO, European Southern Observatory, Armazones, Chile, Garching, Paranal, Observatoriums, Himmel, Astronomie, Astronom, ATacama, Wüste, Nord-Chile

E-ELT - in search of black holes

Topic 23.11.2012 DW Projekt Zukunft Gast Breitschwerdt

The European Extremely Large Telescope E-ELT

Topic Yoga Frau Meditation

Hormone research - the neurobiology of stress management

Topic Soldaten ziehen am Dienstag (15.06.2004) bei der Howaldtswerke-Deutsche Werft AG (HDW) in Kiel die Sicherungsleinen bei der Wasserung eines U-Bootes fest. Kurz zuvor wurde das 62 Meter lange Boot auf den Namen S101 getauft. 2005 wird das Boot der Klasse 209 Typ 1440 mod an die südafrikanische Marine abgeliefert. Die S101 gehört zu einer Serie von drei Booten, die Teil eines Programms zur Modernisierung der Südafrikanischen Marine sind. Foto: Ulrich Perrey dpa/lno

Viewer's Question

Biodiversity goes digital. Scientists are working on a database of the earth's organisms, with genetic information about all the planet's animals and plants. It could be of great use to scientists - and to border police.

Topics

Library of Life - DNA barcodes for the earth's species

An international consortium of scientists is pushing for a database of all the earth's species. They are using DNA barcodes, designed to make the identification of species faster and more accurate than ever before.

Scientists around the world have been charged with collating the genetic data of all the insects, birds, animals and plants found in their countries. Our report visits a German scientist who is involved in compiling this vast inventory of life. The applications of the database, once complete, will range from conservation to pest control or even helping customs officials fight the illegal trade in animals.

E-ELT - in search of black holes

The E-ELT, or European Extremely Large Telescope, is set to be the world's most powerful telescope ever. It's a project of the European Southern Observatory. It's not due to go into operation for about another decade, but the sense of anticipation is already growing.

We take a look at how "the worlds biggest eye on the sky" is coming along. One area that the E-ELT will be focusing on is the mystery of black holes. It will investigate for the first time the closer vicinity around the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. We ask what scientists are hoping to discover and how fundamental their discoveries could be.

The European Extremely Large Telescope E-ELT

Professor Dieter Breitschwerdt will join us in the studio to discuss the telescope further. He heads up the Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Berlin's Technical University.

Hormone research - the neurobiology of stress management

There are various different ways for relieving stress. Tobias Esch from the Coburg University of Applied Scientists has been researching meditation as a relaxation technique and the effect that it has on the body.

He discovered that at the start of meditation, the body surprisingly releases stimulating neurotransmitters like dopamine and noradrenalin. Esch believes this is perhaps part of the body's natural survival instinct. Only once it becomes clear that this is a safe time and place to relax are other neurotransmitters released which counteract the stress hormones, resulting in genuine relaxation.

Music goes to the heart

Coronary angiography involves passing a guide wire through a blood vessel into the heart. It provides doctors with important information and is used for a range of preventive treatments.

The procedure is painless - yet it is fraught with anxiety for many patients. Music psychologists have discovered that certain kinds of music can provide help here. Studies show that patients are considerably less anxious when the music is played during surgery.

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Viewer's Question

How do submarines work?