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Full episode 29.10.12 | 00:30 - 01:00 UTC

Tomorrow Today - The Science Magazine

Full episode

Tomorrow Today - The Science Magazine

Topic ARCHIV - Die Illustration zeigt die europäische Raumsonde «Mars Express» auf dem Weg zum Mars (Handout von 2003). Gleich zwei Raumsonden mit Kameratechnik aus Deutschland werden in der Nacht zum Mittwoch (18.02.2009) den Mars aus der Nähe fotografieren. Um kurz nach Mitternacht nähert sich zunächst die NASA-Sonde «Dawn» dem Roten Planeten bis auf 565 Kilometer. Sie hat zwei Kameras an Bord, die federführend vom Max- Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung (MPS) in Katlenburg-Lindau (Niedersachsen) betrieben werden. Eine Stunde später werden auf der europäischen Raumsonde «Mars Express» installierte Kameras des Deutschen Zentrums für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) Aufnahmen von derselben Region machen, wie das DLR in Köln mitteilte. Foto: esa dpa/lnw (zu dpa 0336 vom 16.02.2009) +++(c) dpa - Bildfunk+++

Dawn Mission: The universe beyond Mars

Topic Ulrich Köhler

Studio Guest: Ulrich Köhler, German Aerospace Center (DLR)

Topic

Tomorrow Today Viewer's Question

Topic ###Der Abdruck im Zusammenhang mit der Nachricht ist kostenlos, dabei ist der angegebene Bildautor zu nennen.###
Rundblattnasen-Fledermaus
im Flug. Das Bild wurde in Ghana aufgenommen. (c) Foto: Florian Gloza-Rausch/Uni Bonn/Noctalis Bad Segeberg
http://www3.uni-bonn.de/Pressemitteilungen/102-2012

Tracking Viruses: Bats and the mumps

The latest from the depths of space: the DAWN probe is on an expedition past Mars. For a year DAWN has studied the Vesta asteroid - and scientists are astounded at the results.

Topics

Dawn Mission: The universe beyond Mars

While a robot explores the earth’s neighboring planet Mars, the unmanned Dawn mission has set out for even more distant destinations. The NASA spacecraft, which is equipped with German-made cameras, spent a year exploring the asteroid Vesta, sending stunning images back to earth.

Along with hundreds of thousands of smaller asteroids, Vesta - which is approximately 500 kilometers in diameter - is part of the asteroid belt that lies between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Tomorrow Today takes an up-close look at the results of Dawn’s year-long encounter with the asteroid.

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Studio Guest: Ulrich Köhler, German Aerospace Center (DLR)

Ulrich Köhler is an expert from the German Aerospace Center's Institute of Planetary Research. He is speaking with us about how planetary research is changing our understanding of our own planet - and ourselves.

Tomorrow Today Viewer's Question

Javad Hekayati from Shiraz, Iran wants to know: what is geothermal energy?

Tracking Viruses: Bats and the mumps

Researchers from the Institute of Virology in Bonn have tested thousands of bats from all over the world in search of viruses. They found that the flying mammals play host to familiar pathogens such as the mumps virus, but also discovered 66 new virus species.

The scientists believe this could make eradicating many dangerous diseases more difficult than previously believed, because even if vaccination campaigns eradicate certain viral diseases in humans, bats may be a reservoir from which the viruses could return.

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The Frontiers of Neuroscience: New hope for paralyzed patients

Neuroscientists at the University of Zurich are working on a new therapy for people who have been partially paralyzed as a result of brain injury, for example due to accident or stroke. They hope their therapy may encourage other regions of the brain to take over the function of the injured one.

They are using magnetic resonance imaging and other techniques to investigate how quickly this process takes place. One day, the researchers hope, patients may be able to take advantage of brain plasticity to recover movement of their paralyzed limbs.

WWW links